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Assam's Roadblock to New Hit-and-Run Law.



Assam : Assam's transportation arteries have been clogged by a 48-hour strike, protesting the newly implemented Bharatiya Nyaya Sanhita (BNS) provisions on hit-and-run accidents. The wheels of buses, trucks, and taxis stand still, reflecting the simmering discontent among transporters' unions who view the law as unfairly targeting drivers.

"This isn't about road safety," declared Ramen Das, convenor of the Assam Motor Worker Associations' Joint Platform, his voice thick with frustration. "The government wants to make drivers the scapegoats, even in situations beyond their control. Where's the focus on fixing pothole-riddled roads or installing proper signage?"

The BNS raises the stakes significantly for hit-and-run offenders, introducing potential sentences of 10 years imprisonment and hefty fines reaching ₹7 lakh. These penalties dwarf the two-year maximum under the previous Indian Penal Code, prompting outcry from drivers who feel unfairly burdened.

"This draconian law paints every driver with the same brush," fumed another union leader, pointing to the applicability of the BNS to all vehicles, including private cars. This broader sweep has drawn reluctant private car owners into the fold of the protest, adding further weight to the strike's impact.

Beyond the immediate disruption, anxieties ripple through the state. Long queues snake at petrol pumps, mirroring worries about potential fuel shortages if the strike drags on. The economic ripple effects are a stark reminder of the interconnectedness of transportation and daily life in Assam.

Meanwhile, negotiations between the transporters' platform and the state government remain stalled. Neither side appears willing to budge, leaving the path ahead shrouded in uncertainty. Will the strike continue, further crippling Assam's mobility? Or will a compromise emerge, addressing concerns without unduly burdening drivers? Only time will tell, but one thing is clear: the road to improving road safety in Assam is currently riddled with its own set of obstacles.

This expanded version delves deeper into the drivers' grievances, explores the broader impact of the law on private car owners, and highlights the economic anxieties fueled by the strike. It also emphasizes the ongoing tension between transporters and the government, leaving the reader with a sense of the uncertain future ahead.

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